Tony Gibson on April 6th, 2021


The mind is an instrument and there is a job to do. In COVID times the mind has been challenged to do its job with much anxiety and fear present. There has been much focus on mental health by health authorities, however in the alternate therapies space yoga has a significant part to play in mind training.
In Oriental Yoga a holistic practice for the body, mind and spirit using loving kindness to dissolve fear and anxiety in flows, postures, self-talks, mantras and meditations have been evolving. According to Saraswati “Hatha yoga’s traditional purpose as a pathway to a harmonised, one pointed mind …has been largely forgotten”.
My vision is for nature and community to be connected and sustained through oriental yoga fostering a loving kindness, health and wellbeing. This practice consequently is designed to help provide mind training for the current anguish and uncertainty present. Without training we will not have the clarity and insight for mental health.
Holistic yoga practice helps provide a mind that can help us navigate our way through life as we work with universal values like compassion, kindness and patience. Yogis and sages have provided a path over thousands of years to nourish our mind, body and spirit.
Classes resumes on Monday, 26 April so contact Tony on MS0419791860.


Mind Training and Oriental Yoga
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Tony Gibson on February 8th, 2021

In Oriental Yoga the connection to the universal and earthly energies is clear as the impact of the sun and the phases of the moon on our wellbeing is understood. The Lunar New Year is celebrated by about twenty percent of the population on the Earth that is not only China but across Asia and around the world.

Chinese (Lunar) New Year – starts on Friday, 12 th of February 2021 and is the Year of the Ox. This is an opportunity to let go, clear out and ritually throw away. How can you honour what you’ve been through and also let it go? It is perhaps, have a few friends over or get together with your family. Eat, drink, be merry and maybe light some candles for a new beginning.

Year of the Ox with those born: 1913, 1925, 1937, 1949, 1961, 1973, 1985, 1997, 2009, and 2021.

It has characteristics of an animal Oxen used to be capable farming in an agricultural society, which attach to the symbol of diligence, persistence, and honesty.

Enjoy 2021 – Namaste Tony

The Chi is Strong The Future is Bright



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Tony Gibson on January 28th, 2021

This Australia Day weekend was quieter with Australian flags appearing outside houses in our streets. There were few official celebrations in the community with COVID and Australian indigenous people seeing 26 January as a sad survival day.
I think it is important to celebrate a national day and it was interesting while travelling in India to see very happy people celebrating the Indian National Day. This was firstly celebrated on 15 August 1947 following independence from the British after a non-violent independence movement led by Ghandi
I can appreciate how indigenous people see the 26 January, 1788 first fleet arrival date as the invasion day. The British did not recognise the land was occupied by a culture that had existed for 60, 000 years. I believe the date of federation of the states may be a better date but I would be happy to see a date that all Australians can celebrate.
The Happy Australia Day song by Luke O’Shea on the history of black and white won two (2) awards at the Tamworth Country Music Awards. This song asks for “respect as we all love this land and everyone still drinks from the same poison well”. There is a need for much healing with all Australians acknowledging the history of dispossession and deaths with the invasion.
Australia is one of the countries not to reconcile with its indigenous people. Canada and New Zealand have treaties with their indigenous people to ensure rights and respect. Like these countries there needs to be education of all Australians about indigenous culture and their connection to country.
Indigenous peoples have poor outcomes in health, high rates of incarceration in prisons and land rights recognition dragging on. It is time to work for human rights that make Australian indigenous people fairly treated. Action for crown lands like the Maroochy River Conservation Park under native title and legal custodianship are overdue.
We need to reflect, reconcile and heal coming together to celebrate Australia Day in a wonderful lucky country for indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.


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Tony Gibson on January 14th, 2021

Last Sunday the trees were bending and flexing with the strong wind and rain and the waves were pounding on the beach. This had persisted for days and this is often the experience in our wet and windy summer weather here on the Sunshine Coast.
Considering the recent dramatic changes like COVID lockdowns in Greater Brisbane and hot spots at Maleny in the hinterland, it seemed that the red flag on the beach was much more than a warning about dangerous surf conditions but a potentially dangerous start to the New Year.
The New Year is still young, however we have experienced dramatic events requiring the population to be alert, courageous and flexible to deal with rapidly emerging changes and uncertainties.
Across the world in the USA the pandemic was taking a deadly toll and the foundations of liberal democracy were being challenged by the outgoing President and his poorly led supporters. Luckily we are fortunate to have so far managed the pandemic more effectively and we have a much more effective and stable parliamentary government and emerging national cabinet leadership process.
As Dorothea Mackellar tells us in “My Country” we live in a land of “droughts and flooding rains” plus cyclones, bush fires and much more. We write many songs and poems to chronicle these special challenges and develop folk legends about how we are able to overcome adversity.
As the ancient wisdom tell us “a branch that is rigid is easily broken …The ignorant person’s strength comes from force and rigidity, eventually resulting in suffering. The wise person’s strength comes from flexibility and gentleness”.
My hope is that we will all rise to the occasion showing that we can be compassionate and flexible as I can see that everyone has a leadership role and these attributes are already present in many of our community members.
Welcome to 2021, a time of change with the need to be compassionate and flexible ensuring that you take personal responsibility for your health and wellbeing and this is reflected positively across the entire community.

Red Flag Marcoola Beach Sunshine Coast

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Tony Gibson on January 1st, 2021

Be gentle with yourself, you’re doing the best you can.

Connect to the calm and harmony in nature to support your healing.

Flow like a river and live with compassion, kindness and forgiveness.

https://www.facebook.com/SPIRIT.3H/videos/413559733030107

Oriental Yoga classes resume 4 January, 2021

Namaste Tony


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Tony Gibson on December 24th, 2020

Waking up early last Sunday morning at Marcoola with the golden rays of light just starting to touch the top of the trees and the twitter of birds, I felt all was well with the world. I remembered that today was the day I worried about yesterday.
Being on the doorstep of 2021 we should remember that the wise sages would say that we need to be flexible to overcome obstacles, to move with the flow of events and to let go.
The golden learnings of 2020 for many people have been the need to slow down and enjoy the present moment and the beauty and peace within. As many people celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ at Christmas we might remember that he said “Seek ye the kingdom of heaven within, and all else will be added unto you”.
It is time to enjoy the wonderful Christmas carols like “Joy to the World” lifting and openning the hearts of peoples and nature around the world.
We just have to look around us at the wonderful natural environment on the Sunshine Coast and appreciate the bush, mountains, beaches and ocean which sustain our health and wellbeing.
We are the guardians of nature’s bounty and need to maintain the external beauty as well by working to protect the natural environment. We want all generations to be able to enjoy clean water and air and feel that connection to nature. For many this maybe just a brief interlude of a beach or bush holiday on the Sunshine Coast but they will become committed to its protection and nourished in their daily lives.
My New Year’s resolution will be to try live more naturally helping to create harmony and peace in our world.
In 2021 there will be new dawns and opportunities so let us celebrate the New Year and the bounty we have inherited on the Coast.
I wish everyone a wonderful Festive Season and may 2021 bring you happiness, health and harmony. Joy to the world and peace be with you.


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Tony Gibson on December 7th, 2020

I love an early morning explore in the Mount Gul’um (Mount Coolum) National Park so last Sunday I traversed lowland and mountain sections of the park before breakfast. The steps up the mountain section early morning had yet to become crowded and there was an opportunity to stop and take in the vistas.
We had the previous day shared views of the sacred mountain in our backyard with our family members from Cairns. We feel a sense of joy and connection to all the natural elements of the park whether we set foot in the park or view it from afar. We want to share that feeling.
I get accused of having rose coloured glasses which is OK by me, however we do need to take serious action on climate change.
I have been concerned that for 8 weeks a fire has been burning on K’gari (Fraser Island) and our air here on the Sunshine Coast has been polluted with a fire continuing to burn. We have heard reports as the World Heritage listed island is significantly consumed by fire to the point that no further tourists can access the island.
Similarly, we hear that the Great Barrier Reef has been declared critically endangered. The Great Barrier Reef is now in “critical” condition and the health of four other Australian World Heritage properties has worsened, according to a report just released by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Its third outlook report marks the first time the IUCN has declared an Australian property as critical, which means its values are severely threatened and deteriorating.
I do enjoy our beautiful clear vistas. We are all guardians of both the natural world and our community’s prosperity and together we can make changes step by step.
“Be the change you want to see in the world” (Gandhi Ji)
Tony

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Tony Gibson on October 6th, 2020


Well it is wonderful weather in the spring for walking and last week I was able to join a friend for a walk in the Glass House Mountains. We experienced the Trackyte Circuit which included walking the circumference of Mount Tibrogargan with wildflowers, shady fern filled gullies and views to the surrounding mountains. This is just a one hour drive away from Coolum and the North Shore.
I believe there is an art in walking with serenity achieved. As Ken Dowling says “by letting go of the struggle and pain to flow with the energy on your life’s journey and you will feel the serene peace of your love and light…You will feel calm, at one with all around you and you will feel true peace in your soul”.
There is a serenity about beautiful natural places in particular mountains like Mount Tibrogargan and Mount Gul’um which does not mean that you need to climb them. A walking trail around the base or a place where you can take vistas of their beauty in the distance can be just as good for sustaining the soul.
As we move further into October and the latter part of the year we are able to reconnect with our family, friends and communities with the easing of COVID restrictions. This will be a challenging time raising a range of emotions. The adoption of the art of walking will help that calming and clearing process necessary for you to be balanced and enjoying wellbeing.
My walking friend works with OZ HARVEST which is an organisation that helps ensure that people have enough food on the table so sustaining both the body and the soul are important. It is a time for giving to ensure that everyone has enough to eat as the community is relying on people like OZ HARVEST, religious groups, service organisations and many other community groups to help ensure nobody goes hungry.
Don’t let walking become a lost art to you as every journey starts with a single step.
Enjoy your day.


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Tony Gibson on September 29th, 2020

The JobKeeper Payment continues for a further six months until 28 March 2021. This payment targets support to those businesses and not-for-profits who continue to be significantly impacted by the Coronavirus.
Unfortunately many people have not been able to get JobKeeper and jobs have disappeared in areas like tourism and hospitality. These payments will gradually be trimmed back and businesses will fail and jobs will be harder to find. Youth unemployment is already a particular concern at 25 percent on the Sunshine Coast. We need our governments to continue the support with a Guaranteed Living Income.
Recently, I was talking to a person who was to receive a reduced payment for JobKeeper, however is keenly looking forward to do some retraining and getting into a field more in line with her values. This person is looking towards a career in aged care or palliative care. As one of the kindest and most giving people I have come across what a great match for this career choice.
Coming out of the virus restrictions it will be important to support each other and help people connect again. As the Dalai Lama says in the “Art of Happiness” our need for other people is paradoxical. At the same time that our culture is caught up in the celebration of fierce independence, we also yearn for intimacy and connection”. He recommends “maintaining closeness with as many people as possible”.
So for some they will see the virus challenges as an opportunity to have more meaningful and purposeful careers long term as they retrain. For others there will not be a job for a considerable amount of time and we need a good financial safety net for all such as a Universal Guaranteed Living Income.
I believe our community will step up and help those who need that support. Intimacy and connection needs to be rebuilt in our community and generous giving in volunteer roles could be part of the solution. We each have an important role in achieving a happy, healthy and harmonious community.

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Tony Gibson on September 11th, 2020

I enjoy travelling to the Darling Downs and Granite Belt in spring getting out of the big cities . We recently stopped off at the wonderful Japanese Gardens in Toowoomba with the cherry blossoms blooming. Also, the wildflowers were at their most intense and beautiful in Girraween National Park with the streams flowing through the granite country.

In Oriental Yoga (OY) we celebrate our connections in nature and the seasons. In practices we greet the day toning, shaping and connecting the body, mind and spirit. By moving the body in the most natural way the practice is invigorating and nurturing yet building body awareness, strength, physical endurance and fitness for life.

Physical endurance requires a strong heart muscle as well as strong skeletal muscles. Physical endurance is helped by the holding of postures building intensity with routines that flex, relax and condition muscles.  With a slow flow OY practice we can provide peace, bliss and understanding to support reaching our potential.

Recognise that you are a part of nature, a child of the universe and that life is a great gift. Cultivate gratitude for the fact you are alive. Enjoy your spring energy.

Namaste Tony

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