Tony Gibson on June 8th, 2018

I have just returned from Japan and really enjoyed my time there with the Family Yoga team in Tokyo and walking in the Hakone region. It was a wonderful experience and I found the people were very welcoming and warm.
The Japanese people we met were very much into naturally maintaining stability and calmness and seeing the most important way of life for human beings is the life of love. They see the nature of love is to cooperate with the correct way of living. The pledge of Family Yoga is to maintain the grace of nature to cooperate with ourselves, with others and with all life.
Our Australian group was able to stay in the village of Yanaka within the greater Tokyo-Yokohama metropolitan area which contains a population approaching 40 million people. This is arguably the most populous metropolitan area in the world, however many narrow streets, religious shrines, parks and community facilities and the subway system has meant Yanaka has been able to maintain its traditional feel.
The transport system in Tokyo is efficient with a labyrinth subway system, trains and buses with car traffic relatively light. Public transport is cheap, clean, fast and very efficient and on most subway lines you only wait a couple of minutes for the next train arrival.
Only a couple of hours away by fast train is Mount Fuji and Hakone the Japanese version of Switzerland where I loved to walk in the mountains, along side clear lakes and rivers and in the forests breathing clean air. This is the place honeymooners go and people escape the city for the country enjoying hot mineral springs and walks for their health and wellbeing.
I see the Sunshine Coast as the equivalent of the Hakone Region in providing that escape for health and wellbeing and how importance it is not becoming part of metropolitan greater Brisbane.
The people of the Sunshine Coast are also welcoming and warm with a lifestyle and natural assets that ensures we are different and we love it.
Enjoy your day.

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Tony Gibson on January 15th, 2018

I have enjoyed coaching and mentoring in business and the wider community because I can see the difference it makes by just getting people to focus on their strengths or gifts. I have seen this as a way to help people get more meaning and wellbeing in their lives.
The challenges of living on the Sunshine Coast are many with significant underemployment and a cost of living equal to or if not more than our major cities of Sydney and Melbourne. For younger people the mortgage stress and the cost of child care are significant issues whilst older people surviving on pensions and retirement savings looking for work or costly aged care places are some of the challenges.
We were told in a recent Federal Government study that the Sunshine Coast’s stock in social housing is half what it should be and the aged care heavily privatised the safety nets for the most vulnerable in the community are not adequate.
The New South Wales Young Liberals President’s recent suggestions that the value of the family home or primary place of residence should be included in the consideration of access to the age pension could lead to people choosing to stay in paid employment longer.
Many older workers have skills and knowledge that are being accessed by the community in non-paid volunteer roles, however they could equally be applied in meaningful paid roles if they had more choices available.
National Seniors and the Federal Government have information tool kits for safeguarding against skills shortages tapping into the networks and experience of older workers. There are financial support and programs for employers with the Investing in Experience Tool Kit available on line for employers wanting to give older workers an opportunity. There is a strong business case for using older workers as many employers like retail and construction would attest.
Whatever stage of your life you have many gifts and strengths to share and I wish you well in 2018. Enjoy your day.

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Tony Gibson on December 19th, 2017

Karen Gately writes about green values to attract young staff and the importance of leadership which is what I have been saying for years. I also think you need older workers that are good leaders and role models that are mentoring with green values to have a balance in a sustainable workforce. Have a read and click on the link to find out more.

As Millennials will soon dominate the workforce, here are some tips to satiate this socially conscious generation.

Australian greenhouse gas emissions are at an all time high, says a recent report in the Guardian – as good a reason as any to consider going green. But there is another factor at play – attracting millennials.   By 2025, Millennials will make up three-quarters of the global workforce. The need for organisations to attract and retain them is growing; yet all too often leaders and HR professionals alike continue to criticise what they perceive to be an impatient, unrealistic and demanding generation.

The time has come to stop complaining about the challenges Millennials typically bring, and prioritise how to get the best from them. Like any other generation, Millennials are unique and demand different things in order to earn their loyalty.

https://www.hrmonline.com.au/section/strategic-hr/green-workplace-culture-millennials/?utm_source=HRM&utm_medium=e-news&utm_campaign=HRM+announcement

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Tony Gibson on December 15th, 2017

A study by CPP Asia Pacific found that people like to spend time at Christmas as follows:
49% of people mentioned being with family, friends or loved ones; 34% mentioned eating, 17% presents, 9% drinking, 9% cooking, 9% visiting family or friends, 9% going to church, 7% TV, 7% walk, 7% games, and 5% having people over.i

Those who mentioned presents, eating, drinking, games and being with family or friends were expecting to enjoy Christmas more than those who didn’t. People who mentioned seeing in-laws said they would enjoy Christmas significantly less than those who didn’t!

Those who prefer Introversion were more likely than those who prefer Extraversion to go to church, those who prefer Feeling and Judging were more likely to mention being with family and friends, and those with Perceiving preferences were more likely to mention presents.

There were also some interesting personality differences regarding Christmas activities – different activities were linked to higher levels of enjoyment of Christmas for different MBTI® personality types:
• Extraversion – happier if playing games
• Introversion – happier if they were going to drink or going to church (but not necessarily at the same time!), less happy if seeing their partner’s family or in-laws
• Sensing – less happy if seeing in-laws
• iNtuition – those who were happier mentioned presents, eating, TV and games
• Thinking – happier if seeing family and friends
• Feeling – happier if eating and watching TV
• Judging – less happy if seeing in-laws
• Perceiving – happier if playing games and seeing family and friends

Now of course, this is only based on people’s views of how much they expected to enjoy Christmas.
Enjoy your Christmas.

Cheers Tony

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Tony Gibson on September 14th, 2017

I was fortunate to experience my high school years at an inner city public school in Brisbane that was a melting pot of different nationalities and racial groups. I developed friendships from this time and for me it has highlighted my belief that diversity is what makes great organisations and makes Australia a great nation.
I define diversity as the inclusion of individuals representing different national origins, races, religions, socioeconomic stratum, sexual orientations, genders and age profiles which make our Australian culture great.
As a manager and business coach I have seen the benefits of diversity in the workplace as individuals bring a range of different skills and can relate effectively with different elements of the customer base. We need to reduce unemployment in the workforce creating jobs and increasing the wealth distribution in the Australian economy as we take advantage of this diversity.
I believe we should continue to benefit from our cultural diversity increasing international connections and keeping the dialogue going to avoid conflicts and more wars. If we look at the impact of a Samsung or a Hyundai from South Korea they benefit the Australia with a transfer of innovation, technology and local jobs. Clearly we still need to do more to value add to create more local jobs.
Australia is largely a migrant nation with most of us having arrived here in the last couple of hundred years and we can trace much of our prosperity to diversity and to our social cohesion.
We can see diversity and our migrant’s backgrounds in the makeup of the Australian parliament. The Section 44 of the constitution eligibility concerns for current parliamentarians highlights how many have recently arrived.
When the Australian nation and our harmony are threatened by people who seek to divide us it is more important than ever to concentrate on the things that unite us.
A thousand mile journey starts with one step and I call on our political leaders to focus on unity and prosperity taking advantage of our diverse rich culture.

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Tony Gibson on August 29th, 2017

I have taken on a role as an ambassador with RE-THINK RE-ENGAGE FOUNDATION AUSTRALIA The RRF is an Australian non-profit organisation committed to influencing and supporting Australia’s O5UW’s (i.e. over 50’s underemployed overqualified workers) transforming this talent to drive innovation in the Australian economy.

The Federal Government has just announced a trial to bring back older Australians into the workforce. The 5 sites that include Somerset in Queensland will spend a total of $110 million. The program includes a short intensive course with better ways to search for jobs and understand the local labour market and optional computer and information technology training.

As a HR professional and coach I am afraid without a holistic approach that recognises discrimination and stereotyping of older workers further training is unlikely to bring results. Many older workers are already highly literate in information technology and have much to offer just needing a chance.

With underemployment, casualisation of the workforce, low superannuation balances for many workers and technological changes meaning many jobs are disappearing the need to respond to the plight of older workers is significant. Older workers are a talent pool we need to nurture and support through broad based programs accessible to all in the Australian economy.

If you would like to be involved in developing solutions please contact me on tony.gibson@spirit3h.com.au

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Tony Gibson on August 20th, 2017

Take a quiet slow walk in nature it will nurture and heal your mind, body and spirit. A walk allows you to be in harmony as you return to an instinctive sense of what life is and how to live.
I completed the 90 K Cooloola Great Walk over 5 days from Rainbow Beach to Tewantin with Cowan Caldwell and Tony Wiggins.
It was a perfect walk for the 3 of us with wonderfully warm weather and beautiful vistas from high up on ancient dunes. I particularly enjoyed breathing the sweet and clean air of the rainforests and viewing the colourful wildflowers of the heath. We were able to cleanse and recuperate with clean and calm lakes, rivers and the ocean along the way.
This type of slow walk is a form of walking meditation as it allows you to be in the moment and in tune with what is about you having a profound healing effect.
I felt so fit and cleansed from the walk and I would certainly recommend the Cooloola Great Walk (see https://www.npsr.qld.gov.au/parks/great-walks-cooloola/).

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Tony Gibson on July 6th, 2017

A stunning coastal icon of our headlands and dunes, the Pandanus, is the focus of a community conservation project to celebrate its cultural significance and to support its conservation on the Sunshine Coast.

Unitywater’s Community Sponsorship Program has funded this
initiative, enabling Coolum and North Shore Coast Care to work with Kabi Kabi Traditional Owners, historian Dr Ray Kerkhove and Pandanus
dieback mitigation expert, Joel Fostin.

Together, they have documented the extent and the many traditional
uses of the Pandanus species and its ‘breadfruit’, after having held
recent community information workshops. The impacts of the leafhopper pest and the mitigation measures needed to preserve this unique species have been the focus of workshops to save the Pandanus. The local Pandanus have developed crown rot, a condition which if left untreated, can kill the Pandanus and cause ‘dieback’ in populations.

If you would like to learn more about the historical use of and
Aboriginal heritage values of the Pandanus, an event will be held to
launch a free digital booklet on such, during NAIDOC week, Friday 7
July. This is event is at Point Arkwright Lookout and Park, beach access number 85 from 9:30 to 10:30 AM.

For more information about the project please contact Tony Gibson on MS0419791860, email tony.gibson@spirit3h.com.au

Go to http://coolumcoastcare.org.au/launch-of-pandanus-heritage-booklet/ to download the booklet.

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Tony Gibson on June 9th, 2017

Mindfulness training, mentoring and the accidental counsellors are some of the ways we can provide supportive workplaces and help to prevent suicides.

This article provides some practical ideas to make your workplace safer. See the article from HRM On Line.

How workplaces can help prevent suicide

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Tony Gibson on June 2nd, 2017

Daniel Bauer writing in the PA Times
“U.S. infrastructure and its present state of operating capacity is dominated by substantial costs to upgrade and/or costs attributed to new construction. Either way, the issue of infrastructure seems to be increasingly categorized as a ‘wicked’ policy problem”.

Clearly infrastructure development in Australia is the same wicked problem even with the rapid expansion of new technologies and funding approaches such as private-public partnerships adequate infrastructure is not being delivering for communities.

My observation is that the funding issue continues to get worse for governments with increased debt and a back log of funding priorities and promises for politicians. The failure to deliver on public transport like high speed inter-city rail and communication technologies like high speed broadband (NBN -National Broadband Network) are good examples of public policy failures.

It is a classic chasing your tail or what Brian Head has described as a wicked policy problem.

How do we stop chasing our tails to fund and develop appropriate infrastructure for our society? It is worth reading Daniel’s discussion in the US.

http://patimes.org/infrastructure-technologies-delivering-impact-2-0/

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